Are We Exhausted from Our Own Culture?

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    WSJ.com – Opinion: The Adam Lambert Problem

    Wall Street Journal Columnist Peggy Noonan  is incisive in her column today by stating that maybe we should not focus so much on the economic problems that dominate us today, but the noneconomic issues. as well. Ms.Noonan uses as an example the Adam Lambert Incident on the American Music Awards. Ms. Noonan states that as Americans, we are not prudish or close-minded, but exhausted by our own culture.  I found this to be a very true and incisive comment.  Has our culture evolved over the years to the point that we have lost our civility to one another, where vulgar behavior is tolerated and at times encouraged? Where being a victim is encouraged by the lack of accountability for our actions, that “they” are wrong, whoever “they” are. “They” can be many things to many people.

    Can we define the American Character anymore? I am currently reading a book that asked you to step out of yourself and become your country. What did you see, how did you feel? Sadly,as I did this exercise, I felt overwhelmed by the negativity as a nation we are feeling. And not so much as pointed at the government, but as a collective energy of negativity from its citizens. A country who has lost its identity, a nation of seekers who look for answers in wrong places. What I felt was we have lost hope, and that is where decline begins. We can lose hope in our government, we can lose hope in any number of things that affect us,or fool us,  to blame something else besides ourselves for what is happening around us.

    Bad things happen, no mistake about that, and often without us being directly responsible for it. But a time comes when we have to lose the victim and entitlement mentality to one of hope and our own accountability for our lives.  Living in the moment does not mean living in a mindset of what is wrong in our lives or country, but what is right and to believe in ourselves and hope again.

    We are exhausted by our culture, but not enough to lose our civility, tolerate the unaccountability of others, and seeing the bad side of  all around us and in others.

    We can regenerate ourselves with the renewal of simple hope and faith in each other, regardless of race,gender, religion, envy, anger. We can come together as a community of neighbors and family.

    We can begin again to bring our nation back to hope, faith and opportunity through action. And that action is simple, love. Call me idealistic, but I have seen the Power of Love in action. Love heals, love causes transformation in a person, a community and a nation. If love is too scary or hard for you to say, then it can be expressed as looking out for each other, the positive energy of giving and believing in yourself,people and life again.

    I am inspired by the words of Margaret Mead:

    “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that ever has”.

    I have seen this happen in communities in many places. There is so much hope and faith out there. Let’s begin to be inspired by our culture instead of exhausted by it. Imagine if each community of hope began connecting neighborhood to neighborhood, town to town, city to city. Let there be a pandemic of belief, faith, hope and love in ourselves and our nation!That is our power, our strength to the world.

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    Mary Jane Brigger is CEO and founder of MaryJaneBrigger.Com. After 25 year career in dentistry that included both clinical and business practice management, Mary Jane transitioned to entrepreneurship by founding Career Path Success,LLC which specialized in career coaching. After being diagnosed with a chronic illness, Mary Jane realized her calling in life was to help people who are suffering from heartache and pain, both spiritually and emotionally. Mary Jane guides people on a holistic personal journey of inner healing where the awakening of the seeking soul begins its transformation to spiritual and emotional well being.